Custom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin Hospital
Custom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin HospitalCustom Identifier Panel Scrub Hats - Royal Darwin Hospital
$23.45 AUD

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PRODUCT DETAILS

  • Unisex panel scrub hats designed for Royal Darwin Hospital
  • Patterned hat with plain panel at the front in a complementary colour
  • Customisable embroidery on the front
  • 100% cotton fabric is breathable and durable
  • Keeps hair totally covered and securely fastened for to meet OHS guidelines
  • Washable and reusable

HAT STYLE OPTIONS

ABOUT THE ARTWORKS

'Around The Waterhole' by Nambooka

Dreamtime: Nambooka is a well-known designer in the quilting world. Her designs are clear, colourful and very attractive. In this design, Nambooka depicted the happenings around a waterhole on a summer day.


On a summer day, people wander around the bush to collect bush food and drink water from the waterholes. The semi-circles or ‘U’s are the people and their footsteps can be seen on the tracks. They use digging sticks to dig and gather food from the ground. 


Because of the hot day, animals like goannas, rainbow snakes, tortoises and frogs can also be seen going to the waterhole for water. Some long gum leaves (eucalyptus leaves) and fruit had fallen to the ground.

'Gathering Bush Tucker' by Gloria Doolan

Gloria is an excellent artist. Her works are attractive, meaningful and very soothing. 


Although Central Australia is a desert with little rainfall during the year, it still has trees and desert vegetation of unique varieties. It is the home of the Spinifex grass land, various kinds of desert flowers, animals and many other natural gifts. Little rainfall in summer or winter makes areas happy. 


You observe colourful flowers laughing in the whole area. It is hard to believe that you are in the desert. Acacia, wild orange, rock, wild passion fruit etc., are laughing to welcome you. 


Gloria uses the natural gifts for her artwork. She depicts the varieties of bush tucker meticulously.

'Women's Body Dreaming' by Cindy Wallace

Dreamtime: The Aboriginal people of Australia are the earliest surveying culture in the history of mankind. They created and manage a sustainable culture of their society and culture. They have inhabited Australia for no less than 60,000 years they used to have significant contact with trade people of other places. 

Dreamtime is the Aboriginal understanding of the world, its creation and its great creation stories. 


Cindy Wallace comes from the well-known Wallace family. She was born in 1973 in Santa Teresa, a place about 80km from Alice Springs. Cindy’s work on women body Dreaming is an excellent piece of work. 


Awelye’ in a word that describes everything to do with a women’s ceremony which includes body painting. Awelye ceremonies women are happy to decorate their bodies with dots, lines, circular segments and other types. Women perform Awelye ceremonies to demonstrate respect to their country including Dreamtime stories that belong to the ancestors. People are going to the elder and discussing numerous problems without fears. 


Cindy performed an excellent job through her artistic brilliance. People attend corrobboree for learning, social mix, and uphold their culture and way to preserve it.

'Regeneration' by Heather Kennedy

Heather Kennedy is a skillful artist, and her works combine vibrant colours. In this artwork she describes Regeneration. After fires, plants regenerate, and the seed pods create new growth which leads to regeneration.

'Bush Tomato' by Audrey Napanangka

Bush Tomato or wild tomato plant is usually waxy looking. It grows in the creek area in Northern Territory. The ripe fruits have a strong fragrance which may be smelled from long distances. A single plant produces many fruits. These fruits are tasty. 


Bush Tomato is rich in sources of potassium and vitamin C. There are more than 100 varieties of bush tomatoes, but only a handful numbers are edible. Some may be poisonous or may cause sickness. Harvesters normally collect sundried fruits of the small bushes in the late summer and early winter. 


Audrey Napanangka’s artwork is vivid and strong. Design shows women are sitting around waterhole with already picked up fruits on the coolaman (Special wooden toy) and digging sticks.

'Wild Beans' by Audrey Napanangka

Dreamtime: Audrey Martin Napanangka is a well-known Aboriginal Artist from Yuendumu central. she is well experienced with Bush Tucker, Bush onion, Bush Coconut and another bush dreaming. Her colour sense for the respective dreaming is excellent. 


Despite her artwork, Audrey is a very experienced bush tucker collector. Normally she collects bush Tucker, Bush Onion, Bush Coconut, bush Banana and many other. Audrey is skilled in collecting right, flowers, fruits, grubs, caterpillars, honey ants and many more. 


Being an Aboriginal artist, she draws numerous images of bush beans, bush food. Audrey artworks are colourful and attractive many of her artworks are published in books & magazines. Alice spring city council featured Audrey’s work in various places

'Wild Bush Flower' by Layla Campbell

Layla comes from Yuendumu, Northern Territory, and belongs to the Warlpiri language group. She is an accomplished indigenous artist whose paintings have been acquired by many private collectors. 


Her paintings are about traditional Aboriginal stories and symbols. Her Dreaming is ‘Wild Bush Flowers’ which she inherited from the ancestors however she has skillfully developed her individual style of painting into the canvas.


This artwork depicts bush seeds, wildflowers and pods gathered by the Aboriginal women in Ventral Australia. Bush seeds and pods are the staple bush tucker and they are also collected for countless other purposes, such as traditional bush medicine.

'Wedge-Tailed Eagle Dreaming' by Glorine Nungarray Martin

"The Warlawurru Jukurrpa (wedge-tailed eagle dreaming) belongs to two places called Wakurlpa and Yuwarli, both to the north of Yuendumu. 


At Yuwarli, the site which is shown here, a Warlawurru made a ‘mina’ (nest) in a tree and laid two ‘ngipiri’ (eggs). From this place the ‘warlawurru’ would fly around searching for prey, up to the size of young kangaroos and emus. 


‘Warlawurru’ would also travel to Ngatirri, near Purturlu, looking for food. The custodians for the Warlawurru Jukurrpa are Japaljarri/Jungarrayi men and Napaljarri/Nungarrayi women. This Jukurrpa is an important part of the initiation ceremonies for young men of the Japaljarri and Jungarrayi subsection. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. 


In paintings depicting this Dreaming, ‘warlawurru’ nests are typically represented by concentric circles and their ‘ngipiri’ and ‘wirliya’ (tracks) are often shown as graphic representations of those elements." —Spotlight Stores

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